Past events

Speaker: Amit Nativ, M.Sc student under supervision of Prof. Natan T. Shaked,  the department of Bio-medical Eng,TAU

Gathering - 12:30

Lecture – 13:00-14:00

Auditorium 011, Engineering Class Room Building,

Faculty of Engineering, Tel-Aviv University

Abstract:

Phase imaging methods exploit the fact that the phase of the imaging field is typically much more informative than its amplitude. The relative phase shifts imaged using these techniques contain topography as well as refractive index information about the specimen under investigation. As such, phase imaging offers the opportunity to image transparent objects (such as biological cells), otherwise invisible under regular bright field microscopes, or topography of nano and micro structures in material sciences.

Speaker: Ran Ditcovskiת PhD student under the supervision of Prof. Tal Ellenbogen,Faculty of Engineering, Tel-Aviv University

Gathering - 12:30

Lecture – 13:00-14:00

Auditorium 011, Engineering Class Room Building,

Faculty of Engineering, Tel-Aviv University

Abstract:

Semiconductor nanowires (SCNW) are structures with cross sectional diameter of 10-200 nm and length ranging from hundreds of nanometers to several millimeters. Vertically standing SCNW can be synthesized by top-down etching techniques or by bottom-up chemical growth methods that provide great control of material composition, nanowire dimensions, and growth location. Due to their crystalline structure and high refractive index, SCNWs provide strong optical confinement with excellent waveguiding capabilities.

Speaker - Y. Fainman Dept. of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of California, San Diego 9500 Gilman Drive, La Jolla, California, 92093-0407 This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Wednesday Jan 2nd , 2019, 13:00-14:00

Light refreshments and drinks will be served at 12:30

Room no. 206, Wolfson Building of Engineering, Tel-Aviv University

Abstract:

Nanoscale light emitters are ultra-compact light sources, which can be densely integrated on-chip with potential applications ranging from high-speed optical computing and sensing to chemical detection and nonlinear optical microscopy. In recent years, nanolaser research has shifted in direction from proof-of-concept demonstrations of novel nanoresonator architectures to the development and investigation of nanolasers with high spontaneous emission factors (β). High-β lasers can theoretically achieve ultra-low threshold energy since most of the spontaneous emission (SE) is funneled into the lasing mode.

Speaker - Prof. Yonatan Sivan, Unit of electro-optics Engineering, Ben-Gurion University

Wednesday Mar. 20th , 2019, 13:00-14:00

Light refreshments and drinks will be served at 12:30

Auditorium 011, Engineering Class Room Building,  Faculty of Engineering, Tel-Aviv University

Abstract:
We present a self-consistent theory of the steady-state electron distribution in metals under continuous-wave illumination which treats, for the first time, both thermal and non-thermal effects on the same footing.

SpeakerProf. Leslie A. Rusch Electrical and Computer Engineering Department Université Laval, Canada

Lecture – 13:00-14:00

Auditorium 011, Engineering Class Room Building,

Faculty of Engineering, Tel-Aviv University

Abstract:

 The use of fiber optic cable in support of the enormous bandwidth expansion has become the gold standard for communications.

Speaker:Phillip L. Gould Physics Department - University of Connecticut

Gathering - 12:30

Lecture – 13:00-14:00

Auditorium 011, Engineering Class Room Building,

Faculty of Engineering, Tel-Aviv University

 

Abstract:

Ultracold molecules are currently a topic of great interest in AMO physics, with potential applications ranging from ultracold chemistry to quantum computing. One method for forming such molecules is photoassociation, where two colliding ultracold atoms absorb a photon and are thereby bound into an excited molecule.

SpeakerDror Weisman and Sivan Trajtenberg Mills - Ph.D students in Ady Arie's group in the fields of Surface Plasmon Polaritons and Nonlinear Optics, Tel Aviv University

Gathering - 12:30

Lecture – 13:00-14:00

Auditorium 011, Engineering Class Room Building,

Faculty of Engineering, Tel-Aviv University

Abstract:

The first half of our talk will be dedicated to surface plasmon polaritons manipulation. 

Surface plasmon polaritons (SPPs) are electromagnetic waves which are coupled to collective electron oscillations in the metal and propagate along the metal-dielectric interface. The electric field decays exponentially normal to the dielectric metal plane, and in addition, the wave exhibits decay in the propagation direction. In our group, we are exploring ways to manipulate and control the propagation of these surface waves. Dror will present several methods that were developed during the last years, among them: Manipulation of binary grating couplers for an arbitrary excitation of plasmonic beams, dynamic plasmonic multi-level coupled systems, exploring the propagation of plasmonic waves on curved surfaces, and the ability to dynamically and actively control the propagation and shape using the thermo-optic effect.

Speaker: Prof V. Malka Laboratoire d’Optique Appliquée, CNRS, Ecole Polytechnique, ENSTA Paristech, Université Paris-Saclay, Palaiseau, France, Weizmann Institute of Science, Rehovot, Israel

Gathering - 12:30

Lecture – 13:00-14:00

Auditorium 011, Engineering Class Room Building,

Faculty of Engineering, Tel-Aviv University

Abstract:

Laser Plasma Accelerators (LPA) rely on the control of the electronic motion with intense laser pulses [1]. The manipulation of electrons with intense lasers allows a fine mapping of the longitudinal and radial components of giant electric fields with values that can exceed hundreds of GV/m [2], 10 000 times larger than the one used in conventional accelerators. With such control is now possible to realize laser plasma accelerators for producing ultra-short and ultra-bright energetic particle and radiation beams. To illustrate the beauty of laser plasma accelerators I will show one can improve the quality of the electron beam, its stability [3] and its energy gain [4], or by playing with the radial field one can reduce its divergence [5].

Speaker:

Prof. Rafael Piestun, university of Colorado

Gathering - 12:30

Lecture – 13:00-14:00

Auditorium 011, Engineering Class Room Building,

Faculty of Engineering, Tel-Aviv University

Abstract:

Optical computational imaging seeks enhanced performance and new functionality by the joint design of illumination, unconventional optics, detectors, and reconstruction algorithms. Two remarkable examples discussed here enable overcoming the diffraction limit and imaging through complex media.

Speaker - Martin Oheim, Director of Research, French National Research Center, CNRS, Founding Director, Saints Pères Paris Institute for the Neurosciences, SPPIN

Wednesday Nov 14th , 2018,12:30-13:30

Light refreshments and drinks will be served at 12:00

Room 206, Wolfson building , TAU

Abstract:
The dipole radiation pattern changes when a fluorescent molecule comes close to the boundary between media of different refractive indices.

Speaker - Prof. Ilko Bald Universität Potsdam Institut für Chemie - Physikalische Chemie

Wednesday Jan 9th  , 2019, 13:00-14:00

Light refreshments and drinks will be served at 12:30

Room no. 206, Wolfson Building of Engineering, Tel-Aviv University

Abstract:

DNA origami nanostructures allow for the precise placement of functional entities such as fluorescent dyes and metal nanoparticles as signal generating or enhancing units.

Speaker - Giovanni Volpe Associate Senior Lecturer Department of Physics University of Gothenburg Sweden

Wednesday Mar. 6th , 2019, 13:00-14:00

Light refreshments and drinks will be served at 12:30

Auditorium 011, Engineering Class Room Building,  Faculty of Engineering, Tel-Aviv University

Abstract:

After a brief introduction of active particles, I’ll present some recent advances on the study of active particles in complex and crowded environments.

Speaker -  Adi Pick, Chemistry and Electrical Engineering departments, Technion

Wednesday July 10th , 2019, 13:00-14:00

Light refreshments and drinks will be served at 12:30

Auditorium 011, Engineering Class Room Building,  Faculty of Engineering, Tel-Aviv University

Abstract:

Exceptional points (EPs) are exotic degeneracies that can occur in open  systems, which are described by non-Hermitian operators.

Speaker: Dina Rosenberg, PhD student in Dr. Sharly Fleischer's group.

Gathering - 12:30

Lecture – 13:00-14:00

Auditorium 011, Engineering Class Room Building,

Faculty of Engineering, Tel-Aviv University

Abstract:
Echo spectroscopy is a central technique in magnetic resonance, electronic and vibrational spectroscopy, enabling researchers to distinguish dynamical dephasing from decoherence phenomena. Only recently has echo emerged into gas phase rotational spectroscopy in few experimental and theoretical works.
In the first part of the talk I will show our experimental results demonstrating the rephasing of centrifugally distorted rotational dynamics via two-pulse rotational echoes.
In the second part I will discuss more recent results that reveal the dependence of the echo signal on the intensities of the driving pulses and on the delay between them. While these dependencies (that are unique to multi-level systems) may seem as severe difficulties for practical echo spectroscopy, I will discuss their unique advantages to rotational spectroscopy.
References:
[1]    D. Rosenberg, R. Damari, S. Kallush, and  S. Fleischer, J. Phys. Chem. Lett. 8 ,5128 (2017).
[2]    G. Karras, E. Hertz, F. Billard, B. Lavorel, J.M. Hartmann, O. Faucher, E. Gershnabel, Y. Prior, and I. S. Averbukh, Phys. Rev. Lett. 114, 153601 (2015).
[3]     J. Lu, Y. Zhang, H. Y. Hwang, B. K. Ofori-Okai, S. Fleischer and K. A. Nelson, PNAS, 113, 11800 (2016).

Speaker:Yaniv D. Eliezer PhD student, under the supervision of Dr. Alon Bahabad

Gathering - 12:30

Lecture – 13:00-14:00

Auditorium 011, Engineering Class Room Building,

Faculty of Engineering, Tel-Aviv University

Abstract:

Superoscillation [1-3] is an interference phenomena in which a band limited signal oscillates locally faster than the highest frequency component available in the spectrum.In my talk I will show several works, involving both theory and experiments, which demonstrate the application of superoscillations in both spatial optics (considering beams of light) and temporal optics (considering optical pulses).

Speaker -  Dr. Omri Gat Racah institute of Physics, faculty of science, the Hebrew University, Israel

Wednesday Nov 28th , 2018,12:30-13:30

Light refreshments and drinks will be served at 12:00

Room 206, Wolfson building , TAU

Abstract:

Ultrashort pulse shaping in mode locked lasers with anomalous dispersion clamps the waveform and energy of the pulses, which therefore behave like discrete light particles immersed in a bath of noisy continuum.

Speaker - Prof. Wolfgang P. Schleich Hagler Institute for Advanced Study, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Texas A&M University

Wednesday Mar. 13th  , 2019, 13:00-14:00

Light refreshments and drinks will be served at 12:30

Room no. 206, Wolfson Building of Engineering, Tel-Aviv University

Abstract:

In this talk we connect the three different topics of factorization of numbers, Schrödinger cats and the Riemann hypothesis. The bridge between these areas is the concept of a Gauss sum.

Speaker - Professor Alexei A Kornyshev Imperial College London, Molecular Sciences Research Hub, White City, W12 0BZ London, United Kingdom

Wednesday May 29th , 2019, 13:00-14:00

Light refreshments and drinks will be served at 12:30

Auditorium 011, Engineering Class Room Building,  Faculty of Engineering, Tel-Aviv University

Abstract:

This talk will overview a new direction of research that can be conventionally called “electrochemical plasmonics”.

 

Speaker - A. Gover Tel Aviv University, Department of Physical Electronics

Wednesday June 19th , 2019, 13:00-14:00

Light refreshments and drinks will be served at 12:30

Auditorium 011, Engineering Class Room Building,  Faculty of Engineering, Tel-Aviv University

Abstract:

“Does the wavepacket dimension of a free-electron quantum wavefunction have physical significance? Can it be measured?” “What is the role of wave-particle duality in quantum interactions between light and matter?” These questions lay in the foundations of Quantum Mechanics since its early inception.

Speaker

Gathering - 12:30

Lecture – 13:00-14:00

Auditorium 011, Engineering Class Room Building,

Faculty of Engineering, Tel-Aviv University

Abstract:

Multi focal spot optical trapping gives a very strong tool for micro and nano manipulation applications. Micro-tools, ​printed by two photon absorption methods, can be controlled by multi focal spot holographic optical tweezers for the manipulation of living cells. This method can be used to get 3D imaging of the cells and study the processes that occurs inside the cell spatially. Another strong tool using multi focal spot trapping is the dual focal spot Meta-lens. It have been studied both in the microwave and the optical regimes of the electromagnetic spectrum. It even been used to demonstrate the manipulation of optically trapped dielectric particles only by changing of the incident light polarization.

 

יום פתוח LMI

Speaker - Gabriel Popescu Quantitative Light Imaging Laboratory, Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Beckman Institute of Advanced Science and Technology, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, IL 61801, USA

Wednesday Nov 14th , 2018,12:30-13:30

Light refreshments and drinks will be served at 12:00

Room 206, Wolfson building , TAU

Abstract:

Light scattering limits the quality of optical imaging of unlabeled specimens: too little scattering and the sample is transparent, exhibiting low contrast, and too much scattering washes the structure information altogether. As a result, current instruments, target specifically either the thin (low-scattering) specimens or the optically thick (multiply scattering) samples

Speaker - Romain Quidant ICFO-Institut de Ciències Fotòniques, The Barcelona Institute of Science and Technology, Castelldefels (Barcelona) & ICREA-Institució Catalana de Recerca i Estudis Avançats, Barcelona

WednesdayFeb 20th , 2019, 13:00-14:00

Light refreshments and drinks will be served at 12:30

Auditorium 011, Engineering Class Room Building,  Faculty of Engineering, Tel-Aviv University

Abstract:

Recent years have witnessed a growing interest in controlling temperature on the nanoscale motivated by applications to different fields, including information technology, chemistry and medicine.

Speaker: Dr. Gil Porat, JILA/University of Colorado

Gathering - 12:30

Lecture – 13:00-14:00

Auditorium 011, Engineering Class Room Building,Faculty of Engineering, Tel-Aviv University

Abstract:

High precision spectroscopy of few-electron atoms and ions is strongly motivated by the need to test fundamental theory (e.g., quantum electrodynamics) in simple systems, amenable to precise calculation for comparison with experimental measurement. Additionally, transitions from the ground state are most susceptible to both QED and nuclear structure effects, making them appealing as tools for testing nuclear structure theory. The frequencies of transitions from the ground state in many such systems reside in the extreme ultraviolet range of the electromagnetic spectrum (XUV, wavelengths of 10-120 nm). However, spectroscopic resolution in the XUV is severely limited by the availability of appropriate sources of XUV radiation. In this talk I will discuss our experimental method of generating an XUV frequency comb laser, and our progress in scaling up the power of this laser in order to enable the highest spectroscopic precision in the XUV to date.

Professor Jin Kang,Department of Electrical & Computer Engineering, and Department of Dermatology, Johns Hopkins University, Maryland, USA

The Lecture will be held on Monday,
28 May 2018, at 16:00,
Room 103, Software Engineering Building,

Tel-Aviv University, Ramat-Aviv

Speaker - Maxim Olshanii, UMass Boston, USA

Wednesday October 31st , 2018,12:30-13:30

Light refreshments and drinks will be served at 12:00

Room 206, Wolfson building , TAU

Abstract:
In course of the 1960's dramatic advance in solvable quantum many-body systems, a good dozen of true gems has been either overlooked or underexlplored. The experimental discovery of the ultracold quantum gases in the 1990's, and the subsequent gain in control over the system parameters and atomic populations, made the gems empirically and industrially relevant. In the last four years, we were busy uncovering them, and putting them to use.In this presentation, we will concentrate of few-body solvable problems associated with the symmetries of the Platonic solids, in turn ultimately related to kaleidoscopes---systems of mirrors such that one can not discern where one mirror ends and another begins.

Speaker - Ofer Bar-On PhD student under the supervision of Prof. Jacob Scheuer 

 Wednesday Jan 23rd , 2019, 13:00-14:00

Light refreshments and drinks will be served at 12:30

Auditorium 011, Engineering Class Room Building,  Faculty of Engineering, Tel-Aviv University

Abstract:

Integrated photonic devices are of great importance in many fields such as communication, sensing, energy harvesting and more.

Speaker: Nir Navon (Yale University/University of Cambridge)

Gathering - 12:30

Lecture – 13:00-14:00

Auditorium 011, Engineering Class Room Building,Faculty of Engineering, Tel-Aviv University

Abstract:

For the past two decades harmonically trapped ultracold atomic gases have been used with great success to study fundamental many-body physics in a flexible experimental setting. Recently, we achieved the first atomic Bose-Einstein condensate (BEC) in an essentially uniform potential of an optical-box trap [1], which has opened new possibilities for closer connections with condensed-matter systems, and theories of the many-body problem that generally rely on the translational symmetry of the system [2]. In this talk, I will present a study where we drive our uniform BEC out of equilibrium with an oscillating force that pumps energy into the system at the largest length scale. In the limit of weak drives, the BEC’s response is linear, well captured by its lowest-lying excitations. For stronger drives, a nonlinear response is apparent and we observe a gradual development of a turbulent cascade characterised by an isotropic power-law distribution in momentum space [3]. Our conclusions are well supported by comparison with numerical simulations of the Gross-Pitaevskii equation.

[1] A. L. Gaunt et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 110, 200406 (2013)

[2] N. Navon, A.L. Gaunt, R.P. Smith, Z. Hadzibabic, Science 347, 167 (2015)

[3] N. Navon, A.L. Gaunt, R.P. Smith, Z. Hadzibabic, Nature 539, 72 (2016)

The Batsheva de Rothschild Seminar
on New Horizons in Optical Trapping: Applications to Biophysics, Statistical Mechanics, and Optics
 Neve Ilan, Israel,  June 24 - 28, 2018  

SCOPE:
Optical trapping has been used to study fundamental problems in the physical and life sciences since its introduction in the seminal paper by Arthur Ashkin in 1986. This seminar will cover a wide range of topics related to optical trapping, and will focus on applications to the different fields.

Keynote  Speakers
Carlos Bustamante (Berkeley),
David Grier (New York University),
Miles Padgett (University of Glasgow)
Mark Raizen (University of Texas at Austin)

 

REGISTRATION DEADLINE / March 1st 2018 / Conference Website

 

Speaker: Prof. Guy Bartal

Gathering - 12:30

Lecture – 13:00-14:00

Auditorium 011, Engineering Class Room Building,

Faculty of Engineering, Tel-Aviv University

Abstract:

Topological defects are field configurations which cannot be deformed to a standard, smooth shape. They are at the core of many fascinating phenomena in hydrodynamics, aerodynamics, exotic phases of matter,  cosmology and optics  and, in many cases, are of importance to practical applications. The intricate dynamics of a multitude of topological defects and the efforts to control them are of key importance in high-temperature superconductivity and topological phase transitions such as the Berezinskii–Kosterlitz–Thouless transition.

Speaker:

Prof. Lorenzo Marrucci Department of physics Università di Napoli Federico II

Gathering - 12:30

Lecture – 13:00-14:00

Room no. 104, Shankar Physics Building, Faculty of Exact Sciences, Tel-Aviv University

 

Abstract:
The angular momentum of a light beam in the paraxial limit can be split into spin and orbital components (SAM and OAM). Only recently, several optical processes involving a conversion of angular momentum from one form to another or other kinds of spin-orbit couplings were conceived and experimentally demonstrated.

Speaker - Eyal Feigenbaum , National Ignition Facility and Photon Science, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore

 Wednesday Dec 19th , 2019, 13:00-14:00

Light refreshments and drinks will be served at 12:30

Holcblat Hall (007) at  Shenkar building of Faculty of Exact Sciences, Tel-Aviv University

Abstract:
In this presentation, I will briefly introduce the National Ignition Facility (NIF) and the light-matter interaction research effort advancing the energetics of such systems.

Speaker: Prof. Eli Yablonovitch, University of California, Berkeley

Gathering - 12:30

Lecture – 13:00-14:00

Room 206, Wolfson Building, School of Mechanical Engineering, Tel-Aviv University

Abstract:

Very efficient light emitting diodes (LED's), surprisingly, do actually become cold as they operate, since LED light carries away entropy.  This cooling requires superb LED efficiency.
Of course, we now know that the photovoltaic cell and the LED are really the reciprocal of one another.  The slogan: "A great solar cell has to be a great LED" has led to all the new solar cell efficiency records.  
What if the electrical output of a photovoltaic cell drives an LED, and the LED light in turn drives the photovoltaic cell?  You might fear that it would become a perpetual motion machine.  Instead it becomes a heat engine in which a small amount electricity can efficiently provide refrigeration, or conversely a small temperature difference can generate electricity.  Such an electro-luminescent heat engine, in which photons are the working fluid, can be more efficient than the competing science, thermo-electrics, in which electrons are the working fluid.

Speaker - Prof. Meir Orenstein, Elbit Elron Chair of EE, Vice Dean of EE, EE Dept, Technion, Israel

Wednesday October 17th , 2018, 12:30-13:30

Light refreshments and drinks will be served at 12:00

Room 206, Wolfson building , TAU

Abstract:

I am not going to talk about optical topological insulators. The talk will be devoted to the fundamental topological nature of the optical field and its implications mainly in nanphotonics. The talk will exemplify two important results of the light topology – one is optical vortices and the dramatic influence of their topological charge on light matter interactions e.g. in linear and nonlinear photoelectric effect. The second will be the emergence of additional photonic degrees of freedom due to the topology of the wavevector space – showing that the well-known SPR (surface plasmon resonance) is not a plasmon but rather a new degree of freedom, and why perfect imaging is possible.

Speaker - Prof. Avi Pe'er. Center: Photonics. Department: Department of Physics. Bar-Ilan University

 

Wednesday Dec 26th , 2018,12:30-13:30

Light refreshments and drinks will be served at 12:00

Room 206, Wolfson building , TAU

Abstract:
Homodyne measurement is a corner-stone of quantum optics. It measures the fundamental variables of quantum electrodynamics - the quadratures of light, which constitute the optical analog of position and momentum. Yet, standard homodyne, which is used to measure quadratures, suffers from a severe bandwidth limitation: While the bandwidth of optical states can easily span many THz, standard homodyne detection is inherently limited to the electrically accessible, MHz-to-GHz range, leaving a dramatic gap between the relevant optical phenomena and the measurement capability.

Speaker: Prof. Eli Kapon Laboratory of Physics of Nanostructures Ecole Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne (EPFL), Switzerland

Gathering - 12:30

Lecture – 13:00-14:00

Auditorium 011, Engineering Class Room Building,Faculty of Engineering, Tel-Aviv University

Abstract:

Quantum and photonic confinements in low-dimensional nanostructures share many common attributes. Combining these effects in the same system allows not only shping the properties of electronic and electromagnetic states by tailored structure and dimensionality, but also adjusting light-matter interaction. We discuss the effect of combining quantum and photonic confinement in semiconductor quantum nanostructures embedded in nano-photonic cavities and waveguides. The ideas are illustrated experimentally using systems of site-controlled quantum dots integrated with various photonic crystal configurations. Applications in on-chip integrated quantum photonics for single-photon generation, routing and processing are mentioned.

Professor Jin Kang, Department of Electrical & Computer Engineering, and Department of Dermatology, Johns Hopkins University, Maryland, USA

The Lecture will be held on Sunday,
27 May 2018, at 14:00,
Room 315, Multidisciplinary Research Building,

Tel-Aviv University, Ramat-Aviv

Speaker - Cyriaque Genet, Institut de Science et d’Ingénierie Supramoléculaires, Université de Strasbourg & CNRS, Strasbourg - France

Wednesday Dec 12th , 2018,12:30-13:30

Light refreshments and drinks will be served at 12:00

Room 206, Wolfson building , TAU

Abstract:

Nano-optical excitations are offering the experimentalists new types of optical modes with inhomogeneous fields and complex beam topologies that lead to a great variety of effects.

Speaker: Prof. James Rosenzweig UCLA Dept. of Physics and Astronomy

Gathering - 12:30

Lecture – 13:00-14:00

Room 102, Ornstein Building,

Faculty of Exact Sciences Tel-Aviv University

Abstract:

Coherent, ultra-fast X-rays are now an essential tool in science, created at the university lab scale as high harmonic generation (HHG) sources, and at the “big science” scale through free-electron lasers. Accessibility and smaller cost, as well as the natural fs-to-as time scale, make atom-based HHG very attractive, but it is limited to wavelengths approximately > nm.  In atomic physics, HHG enables much ultra-fast science, illuminating questions involving imaging of molecular orbitals in real-time, tunneling, wave function evolution in the continuum, electron rescattering, and delocalization. Atomic HHG is enabled by ionization of electrons, their quasi-free motion in the laser field, and subsequent recombination in the atomic core. The more energy given to the electron in its laser-induced oscillation, the higher harmonic that can be excited. To reach the shorter wavelengths, this aspect of the HHG interaction favors long wavelength l laser excitation. Unfortunately, longer l  also implies that the quasi-free electron wave-function has time to diffuse, making the atomic HHG ineffective above 5 μm. To extend HHG to hard X-rays, a new idea is discussed — to liberate electrons from a metallic surface, in arrays of blades forming a TEM transmission line (permitting solution of the phase matching issue afflicting HHG), and to induce HHG via interaction with the surface potential upon return. This surface interaction mitigates wave-function diffusion by avoiding use of a point-centered potential. HHG in this scenario, through probing the electron’s interactions experienced upon its return trajectory, is thus ideal for exploring the role of localization in laser-electron interactions, and may yield 1 Å coherent light on the table top. We report experimental progress in development of this idea. 

Speaker: Prof. Teri W. Odom, Charles E. and Emma H. Morrison Professor of Chemistry, Executive Editor, ACS Photonics, Associate Chair, Department of Chemistry, Associate Director, International Institute of Nanotechnology, Professor of Materials Science and Engineering, Northwestern University, Evanston, IL

Gathering - 12:30

Lecture – 13:00-14:00

Room 206, School of Mechanical Engineering

Wolfson Building, Tel-Aviv University

 

Abstract:

Metal nanostructures concentrate optical fields into highly confined, nanoscale volumes that can be exploited in a wide range of applications, from sensing to imaging. However, their broad far-field optical resonances increase in width as the particle size increases. To narrow these resonances while maintaining desirable near-field properties, we have developed unconventional procedures to organize the nanoparticles into arrays with spacings on the order of hundreds of nanometers, where narrow lattice plasmon resonances can result. This talk will describe a range of new optical phenomena that can emerge from nanoparticles arrays, from programmable and reversible plasmon mode tuning to superlattice plasmons to achromatic flat lenses to dynamic, real-time tunable nanoscale lasing.

Speaker: Mikhail A. Kats Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Wisconsin – Madison

Gathering - 12:30

Lecture – 13:00-14:00

Auditorium 011, Engineering Class Room Building,Faculty of Engineering, Tel-Aviv University

Abstract:

This talk will review our efforts to utilize phase-transition materials in mid-infrared optics. Materials like vanadium dioxide (VO2) and the rare-earth nickelates (RNOs) undergo structural and electronic phase transitions that can be driven via thermal, electrical, and optical means. These phase transitions result in dramatic changes in the optical properties, especially in the mid-infrared spectral range where the Drude response dominates. Previously we have demonstrated that VO2 integrated into thin-film structures enable temperature- and current-tunable absorbers and reflectors, as well as thermal emitters with anomalous temperature dependence.

Speaker: Prof.Hui Cao Dep. of Applied Physics, Yale University

Gathering - 12:00

Lecture – 12:30-13:30

Room 206, School of Mechanical Engineering Wolfson Building, Tel-Aviv University

Abstract:

For device applications, disorder and scattering have long been considered annoying and detrimental features that are best avoided or minimized.

Speaker: Daniel M. Mittleman - Professor of Engineering School of Engineering, Brown University

Gathering - 12:30

Lecture – 13:00-14:00

Auditorium 011, Engineering Class Room Building,Faculty of Engineering, Tel-Aviv University

Abstract:

In the terahertz region of the electromagnetic spectrum, there has been a long-standing interest in the development of devices and components to manipulate free-space beams. Metamaterials offer a promising strategy for enabling many capabilities that are otherwise challenging, such as filtering and modulation. In most cases, these structures are realized as two-dimensional meta-surfaces, a class of metamaterials where the scattering elements are arranged in a planar array. Because the elements are deposited on a dielectric surface, the optical properties can be modulated by actively modifying the properties of the surface. This general approach has revealed a wealth of new phenomena, opening up many possibilities for both linear and non-linear optical interactions in the terahertz range. In this presentation, several examples will be described, including spatial light modulation and active electrical control of terahertz optical nonlinearity.

SpeakerDr. Yael Roichman- School of chemistry, Tel Aviv University

Gathering - 12:30

Lecture – 13:00-14:00

Auditorium 011, Engineering Class Room Building,Faculty of Engineering, Tel-Aviv University

Abstract:

Since their invention in the late 1980s, optical tweezers have found many applications in physics, biology, and engineering. Holographic optical tweezers (HOTs) is an extension of this technique, in which a computer generated hologram is used to shape the trapping beam. HOTs are used to achieve sophisticated manipulation of particles, for example, trapping many beads simultaneously by splitting a single beam into multiple traps, or moving the trapped particles by a projection of a series of partially overlapping traps. In this talk I will describe two projects using HOTs in a non-conventional way. One for imaging through turbid media and the other for creating an information fueled machine.

Program:

The program of the LMI summer school is a one week course aimed at advanced undergraduate and beginning gradate students considering to pursue optics in their advanced studies. The course gives a solid introduction to fundamentals of optics and lasers and covers topics in the frontier of current research.
This year’s topic will be:
* Ultrafast optics and coherent control
* Advanced optical microscopy
* Optical particle manipulation
* Nonlinear optics
* Plasmonics and metamaterials
* Guided optics

for more details please click here

Application and registration

Students at entry level of their masters and PhD studies as well as  undergraduate students starting their last year of BSc studies are encouraged to apply.
Acceptance will be based on academic achievements and a personal statement.  More information can be found in the website.

Information  & Registration:
website - https://lmicenter.wixsite.com/summerschool

E-mail: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.  
Registration - https://goo.gl/forms/Gs374g4ZYOtSMk6t2
Tel: +(972)-3-6407747

Engineering Building, Auditorium 011, TAU

Speaker: Wolfgang P. Schleich
Institute of Quantum Physics and Center for Integrated Quantum Science and Technology (IQST), Ulm University, Albert-Einstein-Allee 11, D-89081 Ulm, Germany Hagler Institute for Advanced Study at Texas A&M University, Texas A&M AgriLife Research, Institute for Quantum Science and Engineering (IQSE), and Department of Physics and Astronomy, Texas A&M University, College Station, Texas 77843-4242, USA

Gathering - 12:30

Lecture – 13:00-14:00

Auditorium 011, Engineering Class Room Building,Faculty of Engineering, Tel-Aviv University

Abstract:

Classically, rigid objects with elongated shapes can fit through apertures only when properly aligned. Quantum-mechanical particles which have internal structure (e.g. a diatomic molecule) also are affected during attempts to pass through small apertures, but there are interesting differences with classical structured particles. We illustrate here some of these differences for ultra-slow particles. Notably, we predict resonances that correspond to prolonged delays of the rotor within the aperture - a trapping phenomenon not found classically.
 
References:
 
[1] B.W. Shore, P. Dömötör, E. Sadurni, G. Süßmann, and W.P. Schleich Scattering of a particle with internal structure from a single slit New J. Phys. 17, 013046 (2015)
 
[2] P. Dömötör, P. Foldi, M. Benedict, B.W. Shore, and W.P. Schleich Scattering of a particle with internal structure from a single slit: exact numerical solutions New J. Phys. 17, 023044 (2015)

Speaker: Dr. Ziv Meir - Weizmann Institute of Science

Gathering - 12:30

Lecture – 13:00-14:00

Auditorium 011, Engineering Class Room Building, Faculty of Engineering, Tel-Aviv University

Abstract:

Understanding atom-ion collision dynamics is at the heart of the growing field of ultracold atom-ion physics. In our system, we overlap a ground-state cooled 88Sr+ ion with ultracold 87Rb atoms [1].

Tuesday, March 21st, 2017
Auditorium 011, Engineering Class Room Building,
Faculty of Engineering, Tel-Aviv University

This is a joint workshop of the National Institute of Optics in Italy, INO (CNR) and Tel-Aviv University, to present and discuss recent developments in the fields of Photonics, and to celebrate NOICE, the newly established joint lab.

Speaker: Prof.Adam Wax Dep. of Biomedical Engineering, Duke University

Gathering - 12:30

Lecture – 13:00-14:00

Auditorium 011, Engineering Class Room Building, Faculty of Engineering, Tel-Aviv University

Abstract:

Clinical evaluation of skin viability shortly after injury or surgery plays an important role in determining future treatment plans. However, clinical evaluation relies on subjective visual and tactile inspection, which provide limited accuracy or other techniques which may have limited efficacy or are difficult to use.

Speaker: Prof. Tal Carmon, Faculty of Mechanical Engineering, Technion -, Haifa, Israel.

Gathering - 12:30

Lecture – 13:00-14:00

Auditorium 011, Engineering Class Room Building, Faculty of Engineering, Tel-Aviv University

Abstract:

We fabricate a new type of optofluidic micro-device with walls made strictly of water. Our water-walled devices can therefore co-host water waves and light waves and enable energy exchange between electromagnetic and capillary resonances.

Speaker: Prof. Nikolay V. Vitanov Sofia University, Bulgaria

Gathering - 12:30

Lecture – 13:00-14:00

Auditorium 011, Engineering Class Room Building, Faculty of Engineering, Tel-Aviv University

Abstract:

The technique of composite pulses replaces the single pulse used traditionally for driving a two-state quantum transition by a sequence of pulses with suitably chosen phases, which are used as control parameters for shaping the excitation profile in a desired manner.

Speaker: Prof. Jacob (Koby) Scheuer, School of Electrical Engineering, Department of Physical Electronics, Tel-Aviv University

Gathering - 12:30

Lecture – 13:00-14:00

Auditorium 011, Engineering Class Room Building, Faculty of Engineering, Tel-Aviv University

Abstract:

The transition from the contemporary low scale integration of optical devices to future highly-integrated photonic processors necessitates the development of new high-quality materials on one hand and inexpensive mass-production fabrication methods on the other. Polymeric materials have interesting optical and mechanical properties, making them an attractive choice for future photonic systems.

Speaker: Prof. Joseph Zyss - Laboratoire de Photonique Quantique et Moléculaire CNRS and Ecole Normale Supérieure de Paris-Saclay, Université Paris-Saclay, France

Gathering - 12:30

Lecture – 13:00-14:00

Auditorium 011, Engineering Class Room Building, Faculty of Engineering, Tel-Aviv University

Abstract:

The billiard paradigm is being widely studied in nonlinear dynamics and mathematical
physics as a test-bed onto fundamental issues pertaining to quantum mechanics, wave physics, and both classical and quantum chaos.

Speaker: Prof. Gadi Fibich, Department of Applied Mathematics, Tel Aviv University

Gathering - 12:30

Lecture – 13:00-14:00

Auditorium 011, Engineering Class Room Building, Faculty of Engineering, Tel-Aviv University

Abstract:

The propagation of intense laser pulses in a bulk medium can be modeled by the nonlinear Schrödinger equation (NLS). In 1965, Kelley showed that this equation admits solutions that self- focus and blowup (become singular) in a finite distance, which physically corresponds to optical collapse.

We cordially invite you to our academic & social event
Schedule:
▪ 13:20-14:10 – Tours in two optics labs (Dr. Tal Schwartz and Dr. Sharly Fleischer)
▪ 14:10-14:45 – Beer and Snacks (Feel free to attend only one of the parts)
Please pre-register at http://goo.gl/forms/y8emOqOdVL

Each participant will get a free coffee mug There will also be a lottery prize of an SPIE membership!

 

23 NOV. 2016 - Seminar - Optical Computed Tomography for Label-Free 3-D imaging of Biological Cells
By - Gili Dardikman, PhD Student
Wednesday, November 23th , 2016 , 12:30-14:00
Auditorium 011, Engineering Class Room Building,
Faculty of Engineering, Tel-Aviv University

TAU-Bath Program

Workshop Program

Please register here (free)

Sunday, 20 Novermber, 2016

Engineering Kitot Building, Auditorium 011

Faculty of Engineering, Tel-Aviv University

Metamaterials: Optical Properties on Demand

Prof.Nikolay I. Zheludev

Center for Photonic Metamaterials and Optoelectronics Research Centre,

University of Southampton, UK

Tuesday, November 8, 14:00

Auditorium 011, Engineering classroom building

full details

On the 26th October 2016 we've launched the center for Light Matter Interaction in Tel Aviv University with a one-day symposium featuring talks by three international guests and members of our new center. There were almost 200 participants, including approximately 100 people affiliated with the center and 40 participants from other universities, companies and research centers.