A Discontented Diaspora: Japanese Brazilians and the Meanings of Ethnic Militancy, 1960-1980. JEFFREY LESSER: Durham, N.C.: Duke University Press, 2007.
PDF

Keywords

Japanese
Brazil
religion
ethnic

How to Cite

Foster, D. (2008). A Discontented Diaspora: Japanese Brazilians and the Meanings of Ethnic Militancy, 1960-1980. JEFFREY LESSER: Durham, N.C.: Duke University Press, 2007. Estudios Interdisciplinarios De América Latina Y El Caribe, 19(1). Retrieved from http://www3.tau.ac.il/ojs/index.php/eial/article/view/655

Abstract

Lesser is the author of Welcoming the Undesirables; Brazil and the Jewish Question (Berkeley: University of California Press, 1994), easily the best book written about Jewish immigrants in Latin America. In it, Lesser argues eloquently that Jews were both desirable and undesirable for Brazil: desirable because they contributed to "whitening" the national population and enhancing a Brazilian brain trust in science and technology, but undesirable because their religious beliefs and practices and socio-ethnic horizons constituted a significant dissonance in terms of the rather carefully managed concepts of a unified Brazilian cultural nationalism.
PDF

Copyright © 2012-2013 Estudios Interdisciplinarios de América Latina y el Caribe.
ISSN 0792-7061
Editores:  Ori Preuss; Nahuel Ribke
Instituto Sverdlin de Historia y Cultura de América Latina, Escuela de Historia
Universidad de Tel Aviv, Ramat Aviv,
P.O.B. 39040 (69978), Israel.
Correo electrónico:  eial.journal@gmail.com
Fax: 972-3-6406931